Category Archives: YA Writing

Bone Gap

 

I read great reviews for Bone Gap by Laura Ruby, which won the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature and was a National Book Award finalist. Awards aside,  I was not disappointed after reading this book. In fact, I didn’t want the story to end. It was that good.

Finn O’Sullivan knows what happened to beautiful Rosa. He should. He watched a strange man kidnap her. But when local authorities show him photographs, he’s unable to identify the man. When asked for specifics—what did his eyes look like, his nose, his mouth—Finn is unable to say. Now no one believes him.

Seventeen-year-old Finn lives in the small town of Bone Gap. The community thinks Finn is a little off. Though good looking, he’s always distracted and wears odd expressions. Finn lives with his older brother, Sean, after their mother left them to move to Oregon with a boyfriend. Sean, always ready to help anyone, gives up college to take care of Finn.

Their humdrum life changes when Rosa appears mysteriously one day at their farm, and they take the injured girl in. She refuses to talk about who hurt her or why. Days turn into weeks, and Sean falls in love with Rosa. After the kidnapping, Finn’s brother becomes silent and moody. Worst of all, Finn blames himself for not stopping the abduction.

The book is a unique mixture of mystery and magic with the spine-tingling mood of a thriller. This magical-realism story pulls you in and won’t let go. I promise.

 

Advertisements

When a Bully Goes Too Far

How do you deal with a bully? Lucky Linderman escapes in his dreams. There he can be a strong adventurer and a hero like his grandfather who died serving in the Vietnam War. But when the bullying goes too far, Lucky can’t hide in his dreams any longer.

Sometimes funny, sometimes serious, this novel by A. S. King deals with learning to cope with what life throws your way.

Please give me your opinion about the following questions:

  1. Do you think bullies have it all together?
  2. Why do you think bullies pick on kids who are new, different in some way, or shy?
  3. Is it possible the bully’s followers would rather be friends with the bully than be the object of his or her attacks?

I’d love to hear what you think!

The Debut of Butterfly Bones!

Butterfly Bones Cover Ebook

Bethany should be dead, just like the doctors predicted. But along came the butterflies, altering the order of nature. And now nature is hell bent on revenge. Because when fate’s path is disrupted, it’s only a matter of time before balance must be restored.

Lakewater Press reveals this exciting new YA novel, Butterfly Bones, by Rebecca Carpenter with their cover reveal.

About the Author

Rebecca Carpenter is a native of western Colorado. She is married with two grown children and has been blessed with four amazing grandchildren. SheRebecca author photo owns and directs a large childcare center where she shares her love for books. In her spare time, she freelances as a copy editor, helping others attain their writing dreams. She finds solace and clarity while spending time with her husband exploring the beautiful mountains of Colorado.

 See Rebecca on Facebook:  bit.ly/28QqB0f

 

Pantser or Plotter?

I’m twenty pages into my new novel. My main character looks over her shoulder and          expects me to follow!

phone pics 100

Can you tell I’m a pantser—someone who writes by the seat of her pants, dives right into the story? In contrast, a plotter carefully plans the plot in detail before they sit down to write.

 

At least, I start out as a pantser, but I’ve learned to consider plot before I wander very far into my story. Main plot, subplots, what the protagonist most desires and what will get in her/his way to obtain that. Those are important things to look at carefully.

The smallest idea can fuel your writing. Do you start with a character, a physical setting, a conflict, or a mystery? Small or big, anything that gets you writing is a good thing!

Happy reading and writing,

Lucinda